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. and until that is changed, nothing about the real dignity and integrity and quality of capable change, which is why i insist on the same rights. it's the thing i keep coming back to in the book and in what i have heard before and however argued. c-span: why, what is different about the way the state of kuwait treats case? >> it is in limbo right number. abortion essentially what is happening is quite complicated. eric reuter process of a trial and appeals based on a case in which gay people have argued it is unconstitutional under the hawaii constitution. this has been temporarily upheld pending the process. strangely and interestingly, the legislature has not acted that aggressively and ethanol at this point to stop this possible legality. the argument is interesting. the argument is not about kate people. the argument is in fact about sex discrimination which is a brilliantly ingenious argument which. it is that if meg and elisabeth's want to get married and they are denied it, they're being denied it because the woman is not a man. she is being discriminated against. and the other argumen
to listen. we're against the changed cpi. but we're keeping the doors open. we want to hear what the president has to say and i always believe that he has an open mind and an open heart. but it's up to many of us. to keep the fight going. >> we are going to find out. no question about it. thanks for your time tonight. i appreciate it. >> thanks. >> and that is the ed show. tomorrow night at 8:00 eastern, my exclusive interview with the man who shot the 47% video. good evening, rachel. >> i'm so looking forward to that. thank you for joining us this hour. ed schultz is going to be joining us later this hour because his show has landed a really big scoop that is going to be airing tomorrow night. i want to get a chance to talk to ed about what they've got. it's coming up later to be the. but there's lot going on today. the president meeting with the sultan of brunei. also, chuck hagel. who just returned from afghanistan. that trip marked by two u.s. soldiers killed. also, we learned today that the helicopter crash in southern afghanistan killed five u.s. service members. although n
of both the expanding economy and schedule changes in rules. a comparison average of about 18% over the past 40 years. at the same time, if current laws remain in place, federal spending will fall relative to the size of the economy and then rise again. the decline can be traced to be discretionary funding. and to a drop off that sense to go up when the economy is weak. -- that tend to go up when the economy is weak.but later in the decade, spending turns up again . part of this is the return of interest rates to more normal levels and our projection that would push up interest payments to nearly their highest share of gdp in did years. another of the decade a significant expansion of federal health-care programs and rising health-care costs per person will push up spending on the largest federal programs, social security, medicare, medicaid. by 2020.-- by 2023, it reaches 23% a g.d.p. what does this mean for federal debt that we expect that will reach 76% of gdp this year, at the highest since 1950. we protect it will be higher than the 39% average. it will be rising again as part
changed, the problem is still evident to not that they actually continue. it's hard to see how congress could develop a more thorough record than a day. >> i'm not questioning whether the congress did its best. it's whether congress found with adequate to invoke his usual remedy. >> congress must've found the situation was even clearer and violations more evident because originally the vote in the senate was something like 79 to 18. in a 2006 extension of his 98 to nothing. there must've been even clearer in 2006 the these states were violating the constitution. do you think that's true? >> justice scalia, it was clear to 98 senators including every senator from a covered state who decided there was a continuing piece of legislation. >> or decided they'd better not vote against it. none of their entries in voting against it. >> i don't know what they're thinking exactly, but it seems to me one might reasonably think this, it's gotten a lot better, but it's still there. so if you have a revenue that wasn't totally over, wouldn't you keep there been any? or would she not at least say a pe
of spending an hour in conversation with in buenos aires last may. nothing has changed, except the color of his cassock. he's remaining himself. and that's a very good sign. because he was a reformer in argentina. he will be a reformer here in rome. but it's going to be a gentle hand on the tiller. gentle but firm. and a bit of humor here, too. he took a nice little bit of catholic inside baseball with that reference to clement xiv, the pope who suppressed the jesuits in the 18th century. that was -- that was fun. we're not used to a lot of fun at papal press conferences. but i think that may be changing, too. >> you know what also seems to have changed, is the language that he used. the direct way with which he communicates, which personally, i find so refreshing. he speaks as a common man, george. am i wrong in that difference between he and his predecessor, who had certainly an air, an intellectual air about him at all times. i mean, and not to be faulted for that, it's just a different tone. >> it is a different tone. i mean, this is a man of keen intelligence, jorge mario bergoglio
replace resources that are thought to be on the downswing. the whole question of climate change, the environmental affects and fracking, they are all swarming around this leveraging consensus or close to it where instead we have more stuff lying around than we thought. >> if it is close, with the environment lists be happy about fracking, but not having all of it created equal? >> some would be happier than others in the community. someone a more vigorous role from the federal government. they want the interior government to regulate across the country. it probably goes a little bit further. i see the chairman trying to find middle ground on that. middle ground is elusive at the moment. oversight hearings are what the energy committee is doing right now. i definitely think that there is a big factor from the environmental community that wants to get back to renewable energy in general. that is why i think natural gas is important for renewable energy and sustained renewable energy. shining when the sun as the shining, when the wind is not blowing. i think that natural gas plays
series "china, change and challenge." james tengan reports for us. the npc has wrapped up its third day and there are indications the incoming government will be different from those of the past. are you seeing any indications? >> reporter: yes, gene, delegates inside the great hall of the people are talking behind closed doors, but elsewhere in beijing we are seeing signs of how things are already changing under the incoming regime. business as usual in beijing, even with the biggest political event of the year under way. but unlike past years, you can't tell congress is in session just by looking around. when i was here last november, this area was full of flowers and decorations for the national party congress, but all that pomp and circumstance are gone, except for that red sign over there which says, long live the people and long live the chinese communist party. authorities usually put traffic restrictions in place on the main avenue running across beijing. that made it easier for delegates to get around, but this year those restrictions don't seem to be in effect. npc's standing
, washington bureau chief of t"th washington post." we've talked about how attitudes have changed. you look at the polls and the politicians. do you have a sense -- what do you think, ryan? why is this all happening now? >> why did everything move so quickly? >> why the sea change? yeah. >> i think actually, karl rove ironically deserves a lot of the credit for it. in 2004, the republican party put a bunch of anti-gay marriage issues on different state ballots to drive out evangelical voters. what it did is it took an issue that had not necessarily been partisan before and turned it into a deeply part son one. that meant that democrats now had to decide whether they were against gay marriage, for gay marriage, for civil unions, against civil unions. as soon as you make the democratic party decide on a civil rights issue, they will shift eventually -- it's going to take some time, but they will eventually get there. what you saw is rapidly over the next several years, the democratic party moved in favor of gay marriage. once gay marriage then became legalized in different states, people went
change everything? after tiger woods's fall from grace we'll look at both sides of the coin. 20,000 dollars -- for a smartphone? is it that smart? you're in the cnn newsroom. i'm don lemon. we'll start with this. a real life nightmare for patient who is thought their biggest challenge would be recovering from dental surgery. hundreds of people around the tulsa oklahoma area. their cases, about 7,000 in all are linked to tulsa dentist dr. scott harrington. investigators say it was an unsanitary, chaotic and contaminated mess. straight to susan candiotti now live from tulsa. susan, have a lot of people shown up for the test so far? >> reporter: we know of about 200 so far. we'll get final numbers later tonight. the state asking 7,000 patients of dr. harrington's to be tested. that's after state inspectors here in oklahoma found what they call deplorable practices including expired drugs and rusty dental instruments that would have been used during oral surgery. you can imagine what patients are going through. this all started after authorities found a patient diagnosed -- or rathe
brother john died of aids. marie howe, who said, "john's living and dying changed my aesthetic entirely." >> the gate. i had no idea that the gate i would step through to finally enter this world would be the space my brother's body made. he was a little taller than me: a young man but grown, himself by then, done at twenty-eight, having folded every sheet, rinsed every glass he would ever rinse under the cold and running water. this is what you have been waiting for, he used to say to me. and i'd say, what? and he'd say, this -- holding up my cheese and mustard sandwich. and i would say, what? and he would say, this, sort of looking around. ♪ >>> this week on "moyers & company" -- >> they confuse bank profitable with bank safety and soundness. they're not the same things. there's a right way and a wrong way. >>> and your questions for richard wolf. >> professor wolf. >> professor wolf. >> we'll answer the question. >>> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of the fiphilanthropy. the coleberg foundation with support from the partridge foundatio
of that is going to change when gay couples are allowed to do the same. the fact is that throughout the nation's history, gay couples and gay individuals have been paying their taxes, and by paying our taxes, we help support all the legal benefits and protections of marriage. according to the government accountability office, there are over 01100 legal benefits and protections that are given to married couples. we have been subsidizing those throughout the nation's history. yet we are unable to take advantage of those same incentives to marry. that cannot be constitutional. host: let me ask you this. should the court be jumping in at this point? one of the arguments being made by the lawyers for proposition 8, today's oral argument, is that there is a social movement happening. polls are showing more people in favor. let that take place. let states decide what they want to do. is there a role for the supreme court? caller: of course there is. this cannot be accomplished in a piecemeal, state-by-state basis. most of the legal benefits of marriage come from the federal government. but me give yo
change as well. at the same time, there are 130,000 married same-sex couples in the united states today who doma says requires the federal government to treat those 130,000 married same-sex couples as unmarried in each of those federal context. that is what caused what happened to edie to happen, that she was treated as on married -- unmarried although she spent 40 years with the woman who became her spouse. they spent time together, good times and bad, in sickness and health, just like any married couple, and for the federal government to pretend there marriage does not exist is unfair, un-american, and unconstitutional. >> hi. i am donna lieberman, the executive director of the american civil liberties union. i am proud to stand here today as part of team edie windsor. my state, the state of new york, respects the right of all couples, straight or gay, to marry. so long as doma is on the books, these marriages are not truly equal. the federal government treats new york's lesbian and gay families as though they do not exist. it is time to put any end to doma and the 2-tiered system of
need a culture change with the regulators. i talk about this a lot in my book. you've got a lot of good-will intentioned people, but they confuse bank profitability with bank safety and soundness. they're not the same thing. there's the right way and there's a wrong way to make money. they're almost aligning themselves to bank managers and wanting to have the appearance of profitability because they think that makes a sound banking system. it's really upside down. you can't ignore the problems here. some of that is overlooked. >> we thought we were going to get a culture change after the big crash. >> yeah, well, i think it's coming slowly but not fast enough. it's amazing that, you know, so many years after the crisis less than half of the dodd frank rules have been completed. a lot of them are watered down. >> by? >> well, the regulators have come to do this. some of the provisions in dodd frank had too many provisions, but we get more exceptions when these proposals come out such as the volcker rule. we get these rules that are hard to enforce and easy to game. >> when dodd frank and
everything that we can to combat the threat of climate change, that we're going to be creating jobs and economic opportunity in the first place. they are going to be a great team. these are some of my top priorities going forward. >> ifill: moniz is an m.i.t. physicist who runs an energy initiative on new ways to produce power and curb emissions. he also served as undersecretary of energy during the clinton administration. mccarthy already works in the administration as assistant administrator for the e.p.a.'s office of air and radiation. she has run state environmental agencies in connecticut and massachusetts, working for five governors including mitt romney. moniz and mccarthy would replace outgoing cabinet members steven chu and lisa jackson. early last month the president also tapped business executive sally jewel to replace ken salazar as interior secretary. the nominees face major challenges. one imminent decision involves debate over approval of the keystone ex-seal pipeline that would move crude oil from canada to the gulf. the project has drawn environmental protests but a
. >>> one of the most famous college dropouts plans to change how future generations go to college. an interview with bill gates. >>> and -- ♪ i don't want to be another wave in the ocean ♪ >> bon jovi provided a sound track for a generation. he's talking to us. hello, everyone. i'm don lemon. all that ahead this hour. first, this. defense secretary chuck hagel is getting a firsthand look at how dangerous afghanistan remains 11 years into the war. also a direct message from the taliban. he's making his first visit since being appointed last month. . it began on a deadly note. a suicide bomber detonated a device in kabul. nine people were killed. a half an hour later nine others were killed when another suicide bomber attacked a check point south of kabul. >> we're at war. war didn't stop. and we have a war here. that's just the reality. we're going to continue to work with the afghans and our coalition partners to fight that war and to assure that the afghan people have every ability and right to develop their own country, their own way in a democracy. >> so taliban claims resp
of politics. let's talk in a broad sense about the changing country and the changing political parties. >> one of the major things that we forget, because we're so comfortable with the united states being a two-party system and that being what democracy is or at least is here, we forget that during the early republic, there wasn't a two- party system, that the founding fathers hated parties and thought they would be terrible for democracy. there was this generation, particularly martin van buren who said we need to have an ordered, structured system, of making political things happen and that's the parties. we have to have a philosophy. we have to show up together and vote on the same thing and we have to hang together, or these sections of the country or these differences in the democracy will spin out of control, and actually they did. >> how did washington, d.c. change over these 12 years? >> it grew like crazy. at the beginning, of course, it was basically just kind of a big -- with trees and dirt and then there would be a house and a building there. then it became actually a city and it b
are just a couple of days away from a big change. it will not look like is exactly when you commute over the golden gate bridge. they will eliminate all of the toll takers, out the personal cast polltakers. it means that things should run more smoothly. jackie sissel hour so reporter is out there talking about how this could mean >> there may be some hitches, would change comes a little bit of confusion. the all electronic toll change is going to happen in just three days on wednesday for the first time. the bridge will go completely electronic for the first time in california. you could see workers on the toll plaza and that is where the new electronic sign will go up. it will lead drivers know was they approach the toll plaza not to stop. that is the message that the golden gate bridge authority continues to press on people. there will be changes but the most important thing is as you approach the toll plaza do not stop. you do not have to give your money to a toll taker because there will not be any. the other change will be the speed limit. they will allow cars to go through the toll
pleaded not guilty to the charge this morning. bill clinton is having a change of heart about the defense of marriage act that he signed 17 years ago. he now wants the u.s. supreme court to overturn the law that defines marriage as only between a man and a woman. clinton wrote in this "washington post" editorial saying, quote, on march 27th, doma will come before the u.s. supreme court and the justices must decide whether it is consistent with the principles of a nation that honors freedom, equality and justice above all and is therefore constitutional. as the president who signed the act into law, i believe -- i have come to believe that doma is contrary to the principles and in fact, incompatible with our constitution. senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin joining me now from new york. clinton said that 1996 was a very different time. so how influential will the former president's words be when the justices take this up? >> well, it's really in a remarkable just event in american history to have a president of the united states say that a bill he signed was unconstitutional. i can't think
are committed to getting the moving. we know that fitness has the power to change lives for the better and we believe that those who are fit not only change themselves, but can be the change agents for people around them. a few years ago come as the issue of obesity and other health trends reached a point where it could no longer be ignored, reebok began to ask some difficult questions. they took a hard look at themselves and the industry and asked what have we accomplished? we are sports and fitness brand but have we done anything to help? what we realize is over the past few decades per-capita sports participation has declined. reebok and other brands in the industry have arguably created a world of fans versus participants. as they celebrated the elite athletes and their achievements they stopped talking about people and what sports and fitness can be to the average person. the next question reebok asked is what can we do to reverse this trend? we decided they needed to change their approach and made a commitment that moving forward, reebok would shift the paradigm to change the perception
the bush administration, that the constitutional law will change, that is controversial. the theory in 1965 that you could be fired from every employee job if were found not a be gay, everybody had constitutional right to marry a same-sex partner. now they do not. they've pushed it through in a few states. that cannot be directly to think about it. if we think about the factors that are very important, it is neither an mutability or political powerlessness. it is the other two factors. is this a group that has a history of being oppressed and prejudiced? yes. is the characteristic we're talking about something that affects your ability to contribute to society. nope. once those questions are answered, the other two the courts as are sometimes important and sometimes are not important. political powerlessness to not have much to do with the decision in 1975 to make heightened scrutiny applied to gender discrimination. that whole scenario tells you. >> those laws being challenged were written before women either have the right to vote or exercised it in any considerable fashion. the books. >>
for thousands of years. to try to change that -- it is time to pull out of there, get our guys on, let them be. host: that was jim in minneapolis. joining us is tom chancre, a pentagon national security correspondent for the new york times. hello. guest: how are you this morning? host: good, thank you. how surprising was this development of hamid karzai accusing the u.s. of working with the taliban? guest: it was absolutely surprising. we spoke with general dunn furred, the new commander of coalition forces -- dunford, the new commander of coalition forces. chuck hagel said it was ridiculous claim. hamid karzai as a domestic and international audience. this was surprising, but for the domestic crop. host: how significant was our push back? we are seeing this on the front page of all the papers. this is getting some play here. what are the domestic implications? guest: in afghanistan, it is unclear. in the united states, we have to reassess what kind of partner is mr. karzai going to be. these are very important 12 months ahead in which the entire security mission is transitioning to the afghan
for eligibility for medicare and medicaid. you no longer need to be a categorical eligibility. this change essentially eliminated this, which says that you are poor, but you're not yet sick enough for medicaid. yet we have medication that not only can prevent you from this, that the federal government considers antiviral treatment. so this is being able to change this. it didn't take away the eligibility category, but it allows states not be penalized for it in 26 states, you are not eligible at all states are still making. here is the map where they are. this is part of things that have been moved. as you can see, 27 had expressed support. seven of them are still weighing options and the rest of them are opposed. what does this mean for people with hiv? perhaps on the good news side, about% of people live in those states that have expressed theirs. 29% live in states with programs. but florida, for example, the florida legislature is not in support. 11% of people with hiv live in florida. as you can see, and i will make this clear, all of those states on the bottom, that as a challenge. e
another prime example. if we were to do those things, it would change the psyche in congress, get people more courage and get us closer to doing things you've written about over the years. >>> we want to mark another important anniversary. and officials say, it has news to go with it. at least 56 people were killed this morning in explosions across iraq. that's exactly ten years after then president bush announced the u.s. invasion. most of today's attacks were car bombings around baghdad, including one near major government offices and foreign embassies. we're still getting information in on that in terms of casualties and injuries. elizabeth, you first, ten years later, where are we? well, it's a very difficult anniversary. no one remembers this fondly at all. the iraqis certainly don't remember this well. they're not marking this anniversary at all. i also think that the war changed fundamentally the way the united states thinks about war. look at how reluctant the president is right now to intervene in syria in a serious way. look at how reluctant the pentagon was to go to war to int
on something like gay rights opinions are changing fast. on the other side of that question, how cognizant are the justices of how their actions shape the country's view of the court? the country's view of that institution that they represent and its legitimacy in our system of government. a couple of months ago former justice sandra day o'connor did a interview in parade magazine of all place in which she was asked about public approval ratings for supreme court justices. public approval of the justices had dropped from something like two-thirds, roughly 66% in the late 1980s down to 44% now. justice o'connor responded by saying she thought that drop was disturbing, and that, quote, i thinkurmre may have been a turning point. she publishes a remarkable photograph that have i not seen anywhere else before i saw it in this book. it's taken on inauguration day this 2001. justice o'connor, her husband on the right, justice scalia and chief justice rehnquist are waiting for the inauguration of george w. bush to start. an inauguration made possible by virtue of the decision bush v. gore. and i
the mood there and whether you think this new initiative by the president will change anything. >> look it was very constructive. it seemed perfectly normal to have a group of folks talking about the biggest issue, our nation nation, and i don't think there's expectation that something over the next six months or six weeks is going to occur but helped lay a foundation for constructive talks between now and the debt ceiling but certainly it was very useful very sincere, very cordial and a good dinner. >> and did the president say anything that surprised you in terms of where he might go with respect to entitlement cuts? >> you know i've been over to the white house, charlie, on monday and sat down with gene spurling so i had a pretty good sense of the touch points. i do think that the conversations were very honest. republicans talked about tax reform, they talked about the types of structural entitlement reforms, the president talked about the kind of things that he felt like needed to be part of a larger deal so again, what i would say the most i think salien
a fundamental transformation, a systemic change, something we in central and eastern europe had to do 20 years ago, something similar. the other part of the problem is the european integration model, the excessive and unnatural centralization, harmonization, standardization, and unification of the european continent based on the concept of an ever-closer union is another obstacle. a few days ago i listened to the speech given by the italian minister of the economy, and he made a point that to build such an integration was a necessity. i raised my hand, and asked, what you mean, such an integration of the current form of european integration is an historical accident. it could have many developments, many of variants, and i am sure this one is the wrong one. these complex issues deserve to be discussed from many perspectives, but it is evident they found their climax in the attempt to monetary unify the whole continent. this was the moment, to use the ogy, when the marginal costs exceeded their benefits. this evidence failure -- and it is appropriate to call it a failure -- was inevitable, byec
of his offices, and residen resident-- residences have, they make his bed, they change his sheets, they set out his table settings. they're waiting for him to reappear any day. his notebook, his cigarettes, everything is there waiting. >> rose: cardinal dolan, the story of whitey bulger tina packer and lawrence wright when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: cardinal timothy dolan the archbishop in new york was in rome for the recent conclave that selected a new pope. i talked with him soon after the vote and dinner with the pope, among the 115 cardinals who selected him, and we talked about the selection of this new pope. >> what does this choice represent for the church, and why do you believe without telling us anything that went on inside, why dow believe he was chosen? >> well, let's look at it from two ways, charlie. first of all you asked me what does this represent, or what does this mean. let me try to answer that one in two w
the groundbreaking novel, published in 1958, had changed him. writinge process of "things fall apart, >> what it changed my life. because i had to invent the language of that story. something that anybody was teaching anywhere. the conversation between evo and english. make it up as i went along. >> chinua achebe died in boston after a brief illness. and those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. of the financial world are on the small mediterranean island of cyprus today. the government of cyprus has brokered a last-ditch $13 billion bailout deal with european officials to stave off the collapse of its banking sector. under the deal, all bank deposits above approximately $130,000 will be frozen and used to help pay off the banking sector's debts. this will result in a specially heavy losses for foreign depositors at the mediterranean island's banks, many of which are russian. in addition, cyprus's second largest bank will be shut down. protesters have described the deal as an economic world war iii. some say cyprus
what i sense from a lot of people i've been talking to is this fear that somehow america has changed, our people has changed, that we reached this point in time and we have too many people in america that want too much from government and that maybe the changes that have happened are irreversible and that it will never be the same again. i want you to understand that's not true. our people have not changed. the vast majority of the american people are hardworking taxpayers who take responsibility for their families, go to work every day. they pay their mortgage on time. they volunteer in the community. this is what the vast majority of american people still are. what's changed is the world around us. it's changed in dramatic ways. just think how much the world has changed in the last 10 years. the global economy is real. we don't live in a national economy any more. everything you buy, everything you sell, everything you touch it's all impacted by things that are happening halfway around the world. the information age is real. it's made our lives easier. it's allowed you right now to
minutes we want to get your thoughts on these changes on what you can bring on board. perhaps you agree or disagree or you think other things should be brought on board as well. here is your chance to weigh in. the tsa allowing small mice and golf clubs and the likes being allowed on air plaplanes. if you want to reach out on our social media platforms -- tsa has a website that will allow you to see what you will be able to bring on board when these rules go into affect in april. it gives you a visual of the things you can bring. you cannot bring anything with a fixed blade. the blade can not be wider than a half inch. it cannot lock. there are some other examples as well. these are the things that are now qualified as far as what you can bring on board. aside from the small knives there are some other things you can bring on. they are also allowing things like golf clubs, ski poles, lacrosse sticks, hockey sticks, and the like. the cause of the category of sports equipment. we have new worlds for knives, new rules for sports equipment. these changes are set to go into effect in april.
, to be the leader of a world religion of over a billion people in a world that's constantly changing, in a church that's suffered much over the past years because of difficulties and scandals, a government that the church -- that needs some adjusting at present, that's no secret. and so anyone who's going to come into this job knows what's before him on this table. >> pelley: well, with the bells of st. peter's tolling behind us father tom rosica, thank you very much. >> it's a pleasure to be with you. >> pelley: in afghanistan, two americans and two afghans were killed today in an attack in wardack province. an afghan wearing a police uniform opened fire on them at a joint military base. he was killed in the shootout. ten americans were wounded. this appears to be the latest in a series of insider attacks adding to rising tension between the afghan and u.s. governments. charlie d'agata is at our bureau there kabul tonight. charlie you've just come back from a mission that involved both u.s. and afghan forces working side by side. what's the relationship like? >> reporter: scott, things seem a lo
skeptical about this. because of some changes they decided not to change the age at which the medicare changes would begin hitting. republicans have been promising for years now that if you are 55 you will not have to worry about these medicare changes. now the moderates do seem to be on board on the gop conference. host: on the senate side, "the washington times closed what reporting this morning -- it is winning support from other republicans like senator mark o. rubio from florida. talk about that. guest: the senate budget is a little bit more notable in the sense that since 2009 the senate democrats passed the budget. this is going to be a significant political test for them. the senate makes the process more difficult for the democrats over there in the budget speech. they have only a -- they cannot lose a single vote or else the vote would be deadlocked 11-11. patty murray, the chairwoman, has to appease the independent from vermont who causes of the socialist and centrist like mark warner. it is very difficult and they are having trouble over there. the next thing that happens f
archbishop of buenos aires was elected by the cardinals yesterday in a strong religion of changing die nam milks. he was selected on the fifth round of voting. at the secret conclave. his name announced for a crowd of over a hundred thousand people gathered in st. peters square. that was quite a sight, mike barnicle, to watch unfold. >> the theater, the theater of the church is unmatched, unparalleled when you consider the ramifications of what we all watched yesterday. hundreds of thousands of people in st. peters square and millions around the world watching this. everything in doubt until those doors opened. the theater of black smoke and white smoke. there was no red state, blue state, no chuck todd standing in front of a map announcing winners. >> not that we don't love that. >> i know, i know. >> it's all go. >> not that there is anything wrong with that. >> until that door opened, we did not know who the next pope would be and the significance of the choice is overwhelming as well. the pope crosses the ocean to latin america. first time it's happened as you pointed out, joe. >> righ
in segregatio that 81% that andrew mentioned is not going to change its mind as it grows older. >> rose: we conclude with a conversation with the remarkable young filmmaker named adam leone. his new movie is called "gimme the loot." >> we really wanted to show a part of new york that isn't seen so much on movies and t.v. right now, i think. because a lot of people i know talk about how new york has become a mall and the big box stores. that's a part of new york but there's still this energy and there are these neighborhoods that are very much ale a very much still neighborhoods and so we wanted to go out into the bronx and all over the city and show that. >> rose: same-sex marriage and "gimme the loot" when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: it is an important week for the united states supreme court. starting on tuesday, the court will hearing amounts in two cases involving the legality of same-sex marriage. the nine justices will first consider an appeal of an earlier ruling that rendered california's
data, i think a decisive majority of americans are in favor of this and that's unlikely to change. that will probably only increase. california several years ago, the people of california rejected gay marriage and put in their constitution an anti-gay marriage, proposition 8. if they were revote that today i think result would be dramatically different so the question is will the supreme court justice, in effect, count the states as it sometimes has in various contexts, cruel and unusual punishment or elsewhere, or will it look at other indices of broader public opinion and to what extent it actually thinks that public opinion matters. >> rose: measure the velocity of the change after not seeming to go anywhere for so long. >> when we started-- and i wrote the first piece in '89 in defense of this-- and for the first five years they laughed at you. (laughs) seriously. gay marriage? they were like -- they were laughing. and for the first ten years people forget this but it was the left that was -- that was opposed to this. thinking it was -- i was a patriarchal trying to join an in
and difficult and constantly changing in the general ugliness of american life, must in turn be translated and interpreted and applied to our armed forces. and while it is sometimes true that the political decision, the social policy decisions, the legal or constitutional decisions that emerges in the civilian arena is transferred in exactly the same manner to all military. there are times when it is not. there are times when the particular necessities of national security, or the particular intensity of the organization and values and mission of the military requires some adjustments of rules that we would adopt in the civilian sphere that cannot be adopted, lock, stock and barrel in exactly the same way in the context of our military. we are all deeply grateful to the armed forces of the united states and to those who have served this over the centuries, not just for all that have done, but for the extraordinary commitment over history like many ups and downs, powerful powerful commitment to our fundamental values, to our commitment to the rule of law, to our conception of due process an
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